Bread Machine French Bread – Easy Baguette Recipe

This bread machine French bread recipe is very easy to make. It only uses a few simple ingredients such as flour, water, salt and yeast. Moreover, our French bread tastes great and you can easily mold it into a beautiful baguette shape. Your family will be amazed by your baking skills… while you smirk because you made it with the help of a bread machine! This bread recipe can also be a fun family project, especially if you have small children. Have them shape your bread for you. You can always reshape the dough if they create a food monstrosity.

Delicious Bread Machine French Bread (Baguette)

Bread Machine French Bread

This is a pretty simple recipe because I made it for beginners. Many online French bread recipes call for a number of different “rising” periods, complex rolling & shaping of the bread, adding steam inside the oven, etc. However, my French bread recipe does not include these steps because I believe that bread machine recipes should not be too complicated. Let professional bakers make the fancy, over complicated and expensive baguettes while you make some easy, delicious and very inexpensive homemade French bread & baguettes for your family.

Tender Inside of Bread Machine French Bread (Baguette)

Tender Interior of a Bread Machine Baguette

Please be aware that this is not the usual set & forget bread machine recipe. You will have to shape the bread in order to create the classic baguette shape (versus getting the standard bread machine “block” shape). Moreover, given the baguette shape, this French bread needs to be finished in an oven. Nevertheless, this bread machine recipe is much easier than making French bread by hand! It also looks much nicer than a “block” of bread machine bread.

For more great recipes, please visit Bread Dad’s main Bread Machine Recipes section. Bread Dad also has a printable and “pin-able” recipe at the bottom of the page. If you like this recipe, we hope you will leave a comment below and give us a 5 star rating. Thanks!

French Bread Dough from a Bread Machine

Bread Machine French Bread Dough

Ingredients – Bread Machine French Bread (Baguette)

  • 1 1/3 Cups – Water (lukewarm) – 307 milliliters
  • 3 1/2 Cups – Bread Flour – 420 grams
  • 2 Teaspoons – Bread Machine Yeast – 10 milliliters
  • 1 Teaspoon – Salt – 5 milliliters
  • 2 Tablespoons – Olive Oil (to coat dough) – 30 milliliters

Servings – Roughly 12 slices per medium baguette

  • Equipment required for this recipe –  Measuring cup & spoons, flexible spatula, oven mitts, large cutting board, baking sheet, pastry brush, cooling rack, oven… and of course, a bread machine! Visit our “equipment store” if you are missing anything.

Instructions – Bread Machine French Bread (Baguette)

  • Place the water and then the rest of the ingredients into the bread pan. You can make a little indent on top of the flour in order to avoid the yeast falling into the water (until the machine starts). Do not combine the salt with the yeast (as the salt can kill the yeast). Place the yeast & salt in separate parts of the bread pan.
  • Put your machine on the “Dough” setting and press the start button. In our bread machine, the kneading & rising on the dough setting takes about 1:30 hours.
  • When your bread machine has finished, unplug the machine & pour the dough onto a cutting board. Wear oven mitts (as the bread pan/bread machine may be hot). Sprinkle some flour on the cutting board (before you pour the dough) in order to avoid the dough sticking to the cutting board.
  • Divide the dough into 4 equal parts if you want to make 4 skinny baguettes (roughly 12 inches long). Or divide the dough into 2 equal parts in order to make 2 thicker French bread “rolls”.
  • Roll the divided dough with your hands into your preferred shape (i.e. baguette or thicker bread roll). See our tips below on shaping the bread dough (especially about the making the dough roll about 1/2 the width of your desired end product… as the dough expands as the yeast rises).
  • Place the shaped dough onto a nonstick baking sheet.
  • Coat the dough with olive oil. Use a small pastry brush.
  • Cover the dough & baking sheet with a light kitchen cloth or plastic wrap in order to protect from dust, etc.
  • Let the dough rise for 1 hour.
  • During this “rising” time, preheat your oven to 450 degrees F.
  • After the hour, remove the covering from the dough and “score” (slice) the top of each dough roll with a sharp knife. Make diagonal slices about 1/2 inch deep and about 3 inches apart. This will help prevent the bread from cracking during baking. See the tips below about how to score bread.
  • Place the baking sheet in the oven. It should bake at 450 degrees for 15-20 minutes or until golden brown. Wear oven mitts.
  • At the 8-10 minute mark, turn the baking sheet around in order to ensure an even “browning” of the bread. Wear oven mitts.
  • Remove the baking sheet when done and place the bread on a cooling rack. Wear oven mitts.

If you liked this recipe, please leave a comment below & give us a 5 star rating. The recipe comment section is located at the bottom of this page. Your comments help us to improve & clarify our recipe instructions. Moreover, it is ALWAYS great to hear from someone who has enjoyed our recipes!

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Tips – Bread Machine French Baguette Recipe

  • The tips below are designed to help bread machine “novices” and/or people with limited baking experience.
  • Don’t worry if your French bread develops some small “cracks” while baking even if you scored the bread. French bread is tough to make perfectly when you start out (because cracking can occur if the dough is too dry, too wet, etc.). However, one French bread secret is to let the dough fully rise before putting it in the oven so the French bread doesn’t expand too much during the baking process. Nevertheless, even with a few small cracks, your French bread will look great and taste fantastic!
  • If you have trouble removing all of the dough from the bread pan, gently use a flexible silicon spatula to help remove the dough.
  • “Scoring the bread” means cutting slices into the top of the dough. I like to use diagonal slices that are roughly 2 -3 inches apart and about 1/2 inch deep. Scoring allows the bread to expand during the baking process without cracking at the seams. Many professional bakers use scoring in order to add fancy designs to their breads. As you get comfortable with making a bread machine French baguette, you can experiment with different scoring patterns.
  • To score the bread, you will need a sharp knife or a professional scoring tool (bread lame) in order to avoid tugging at the dough while you slice.
  • Be aware that the dough can double in size during the hour when it is left to rise. Therefore, you need to roll your dough so it is 1/2 the width of your planned French bread width. If you roll the initial dough into a normal baguette size loaf, it will be a much fatter bread after it rises & bakes. You need to roll the dough much thinner if you want a skinny baguette. I have added pictures above of a thinner baguette version and thicker French bread loaf version. Both taste great! However, just remember that your dough will grow in size as the yeast ferments and the bread rises.
  • If anything is a little odd after the dough rises (i.e. a bit of the dough is sticking out), you can GENTLY press it back into shape. However, be gentle and don’t lift the dough because you don’t want to crush the airy dough.
  • Some people use specialized French bread pans (for oven baking) in order to create a prefect round shape for their French bread. These curved French bread pans also help prevent the French bread from spreading (widening too much) during the baking process. FYI – I just use a regular bread/cookie baking tray or sheet because I don’t mind a flat bottom on my French bread!

 

  • If you have run out of bread flour, you can use all-purpose flour to make French bread. An all-purpose flour French bread might not be as fluffy/airy (as if you used bread flour) but it is still pretty good.
  • Don’t use cold water because that will inhibit the growth of the yeast. The water should be lukewarm in temperature. If you use cold water, your bread may have trouble rising properly.
  • Homemade French bread is much cheaper than buying some fancy bakery baguette. It is also much more fun to make your own freshly made bread versus driving across town on a snowy/rainy day in order to buy some day old French bread.
  • You can easily turn French bread into delicious homemade garlic bread by cutting the French bread in half (lengthwise), slathering on some butter and minced garlic (onto the soft interiors of the bread halves) and then baking them in the oven!
  • Once you have mastered making French bread, you might like to try our Bread Machine Italian Bread recipe.
  • FYI – According to Wikipedia, “In France, not all long loaves are baguettes; for example, a short, almost rugby ball-shaped loaf is a bâtard (literally, bastard), or a “torpedo loaf” in English… Another tubular shaped loaf is known as a flûte, also known in the United States as a parisienne. Flûtes closely resemble baguettes but are about twice the size. A thinner loaf is called a ficelle (string). A short baguette is sometimes known as a baton (stick), or in the UK referred to using the English translation French stick… French breads are also made in forms such as a miche, which is a large pan loaf, and a boule, literally ball in French, a large round loaf. Sandwich-sized loaves are sometimes known as demi-baguettes or tiers. Italian baguettes, or baguette italienne, involves more spices and a denser texture, giving the baguette a slightly different, more Italian, taste.”
  • If you have a problem with a bread machine recipe, please make sure that you are following the recipe exactly (i.e. using the correct bread machine settings), you are using the correct amount of an ingredient (i.e. don’t eyeball the measurements versus using a measurement cup or accidentally add a teaspoon when a tablespoon is called for), you are using the correct ingredients (i.e. bread machine yeast versus regular yeast or bread flour versus all purpose flour), etc. Please don’t “wing” things with recipes.
  • If you start substituting ingredients (i.e. different types of flour), you are experimenting and should not expect similar results to the recipe shown above. Experimenting can be fun. However, you should expect some successes but more potential disappointments when you start to experiment with recipes. For example, if you substitute whole wheat flour for the bread flour, you will probably experience a problem (as whole wheat flour doesn’t rise nearly as well as bread flour). Moreover, whole wheat flour has a totally different flavor.
  • Be aware that some bread recipes may differ slightly between different types of bread machines. Therefore, please read your bread machine manufacturer’s  instructions for basic bread recipes (i.e. white bread or whole wheat bread) as these are more likely to work on your individual bread machine.
  • My recipes are based on US ingredient measurements (i.e. US cups & tablespoons). However, as a courtesy to our European visitors, I have also included some very ROUGH European equivalents (i.e. grams & milliliters). Since I rarely use European measurements when baking, please let me know in the comment section below if any of the European ingredient measurements need to be changed (i.e. for XYZ ingredient, milliliters are more commonly used versus the grams information listed in the recipe).
  • If you haven’t used your bread machine in a long time, please buy some new bread machine yeast before making your bread. Old yeast can die or lose its potency and this will lead to bread that does not rise properly. Bread machine yeast may not be viable if it has been sitting in your pantry for years.
  • You can visit our instructional videos section if you want to watch videos that provide information on common bread machine and bread making problems & solutions.
  • Always wear oven mitts/gloves when dealing with ovens & bread machines. They can get very hot.
  • For more bread machine recipes (i.e. white bread, oatmeal bread, Italian bread, cornbread & pizza dough), you should visit Bread Dad’s section on easy Bread Machine Recipes.

If you liked this recipe, please leave a comment below & give us a 5 star rating. The recipe comment section is located at the bottom of this page. Your comments help us to improve & clarify our recipe instructions. Moreover, it is ALWAYS great to hear from someone who has enjoyed our recipes!!

Reference Sources

French Bread Machine Recipe Questions

What is the traditional French bread called?

Traditional French bread is called a baguette. A baguette comes in a long narrow cylindrical shape. The word baguette means wand, baton or stick. French bread or baguette is typically made from flour, water, yeast and salt. Nevertheless, there are many other types of well-known breads from France such as the brioche, fougasse, pain de campagne, etc.

What is the French bread setting on my bread machine?

If your bread machine has a French bread setting, it will allow you to make a crusty “French-type” bread with your bread machine. However, the bread will not be in a baguette share. Rather the bread will be in the standard bread machine “block” shape. The resulting bread is basically a bread machine white bread recipe that has been baked longer and has a thicker crust.

If you want to make a French bread with a baguette shape, please try the bread machine recipe on this page. Or if you prefer a block shaped French bread loaf, please read the instructions/manual included with your bread machine because it should contain a basic French bread recipe that will work on your machine. However, be aware that some bread machines have a very limited number of settings and may not have a French bread setting.

Personally, I think that our bread machine French baguette recipe creates a French bread that is much nicer and tastes better than the standard “block” bread machine French bread.

How to eat French bread?

You can cut French bread down the middle and add your favorite sandwich ingredients (i.e. cold cuts) in order to make it into a delicious hero or sub. Or cut the French bread into slices and slather on some butter, cream cheese or olive oil. Yum! In my opinion, French bread tastes even better when it is still warm.

What is the difference between French bread and Italian bread?

There are hundreds of different French and Italian breads so it is hard to generalize. However, in America, the typical “French” bread is usually made with just flour, water, yeast and salt. American-style French bread is also typically in a thin baguette shape and has a harder crust. In contrast, in America, the typical “Italian” bread may contain more ingredients such as milk and sugar. American-style Italian bread is also typically a wider loaf (versus a narrow baguette) and has a softer crust.

Bread Machine French Bread
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5 from 48 votes

Bread Machine French Bread - Easy Baguette Recipe

This bread machine french bread recipe is very easy to make. It only uses a few simple ingredients such as flour, water, salt and yeast. Moreover, this french bread tastes great and you can mold it into a beautiful baguette shape. Your family will be amazed by baking skills... while you smirk because you made it with the help of a bread machine! Visit BreadDad.com for more great bread machine recipes.
Prep Time2 hrs 40 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time3 hrs
Course: Appetizer, Dinner, Lunch, Sandwich
Cuisine: American, European
Keyword: Baguette Recipe, Bread Machine Baguette, Bread Machine French Bread, French Bread, French Bread Recipe
Servings: 40 Slices
Calories: 48kcal
Author: Bread Dad

Ingredients

  • 1 1/3 Cups Water (lukewarm)
  • 3 1/2 Cups Bread Flour
  • 2 Teaspoons Bread Machine Yeast
  • 1 Teaspoon Salt
  • 2 Tablespoons Olive Oil (to coat dough)

Instructions

  • Place the water and then the rest of the ingredients into the bread pan. You can make a little indent on top of the flour in order to avoid the yeast falling into the water (until the machine starts). Do not combine the salt with the yeast (as the salt can kill the yeast). Place the yeast & salt in separate parts of the bread pan.
  • Put your machine on the "Dough" setting and press the start button. In our bread machine, the kneading & rising on the dough setting takes about 1:30 hours.
  • When your bread machine has finished, unplug the machine & pour the dough onto a cutting board. Wear oven mitts (as the bread pan/bread machine may be hot). Sprinkle some flour on the cutting board (before you pour the dough) in order to avoid the dough sticking to the cutting board.
  • Divide the dough into 4 equal parts if you want to make 4 skinny baguettes (roughly 12 inches long). Or divide the dough into 2 equal parts in order to make 2 thicker french bread "rolls".
  • Roll the divided dough with your hands into your preferred shape (i.e. baguette or thicker bread roll). See our tips below on shaping the bread dough (especially about the making the dough roll about 1/2 the width of your desired end product... as the dough expands as the yeast rises).
  • Place the shaped dough onto a nonstick baking sheet.
  • Coat the dough with olive oil. Use a small pastry brush.
  • Cover the dough & baking sheet with a light kitchen cloth or plastic wrap in order to protect from dust, etc.
  • Let the dough rise for 1 hour.
  • During this "rising" time, preheat your oven to 450 degrees F.
  • After the hour, remove the covering from the dough and "score" (slice) the top of each dough roll with a sharp knife. Make diagonal slices about 1/2 inch deep and about 3 inches apart. This will help prevent the bread from cracking during baking. See the tips below about how to score bread.
  • Place the baking sheet in the oven. It should bake at 450 degrees for 15-20 minutes or until golden brown. Wear oven mitts.
  • At the 8-10 minute mark, turn the baking sheet around in order to ensure an even "browning" of the bread. Wear oven mitts.
  • Remove the baking sheet when done and place the bread on a cooling rack. Wear oven mitts.

Notes

This is a Bread Dad recipe and may not be copied or reproduced. This recipe is copyright protected under the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act.
 
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The nutritional information is provided using recipe tools such as WP Recipe Maker. These figures should only be considered as an estimate. They should not be construed as a guarantee of accuracy given visitors may use different serving sizes, ingredients, etc. See our legal disclaimer for additional nutrition disclosures.

Nutrition

Serving: 1Slice | Calories: 48kcal | Carbohydrates: 8g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 59mg | Potassium: 17mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 1IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 2mg | Iron: 1mg

If you liked this recipe, please leave a comment below & give us a 5 star rating. Your comments really help us to improve & clarify our recipe instructions. Beginning bakers also learn a lot from your baking suggestions, ideas & recipe variations. We also love to hear from people who have enjoyed our recipes!!!

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